More Details

Bandhavgarh National Park

Bandhavgarh National Park, located in the Umaria district of Madhya Pradesh, is a tiger reserve with more than 60 tigers. With one of the highest tiger densities, Bandhavgarh is one of India’s top tiger reserves. Once home to white tigers, the park is known for its extensive biodiversity and has over 350 species of birds and 80 species of butterflies.

Although tigers aren’t as easy to spot in the Bandhavgarh National Park, there are some spots that royal Bengal tigers frequent. For example, Chakradhara, surrounded by a hilly region, is ideal for spotting tigers in Bandhavgarh. Now, let’s take a quick look at Bandhavgarh’s history.

The History‌ ‌of‌ Bandhavgarh National Park

Once the Bandhavgarh Fort was the royal seat of the Mewar Kingdom, located in the heart of the Bandhavgarh National Park. However, in 1617 A.D, the royal seat was moved to Rewa, and the deserted Bandhavgarh region was overrun by nature. The forests then became the hunting ground for the Maharajas. At the time, the royals thought killing tigers was auspicious and over the years hundreds of tigers were hunted. Over time, both the wildlife and the forest degraded and no measures were taken to conserve the area.

  • 1968: After witnessing the dire straits of the forest and its wildlife, Rewa’s Maharaja Martand Singh brought forward a proposal of opening a national park. A 105 square kilometres of the area was declared as a park in 1968. Authorities took measures to reduce poaching in the region and also stopped cattle grazing. Dams and water holes were built throughout the park. As a result of these measures, the wildlife population increased. However, although the tiger population also increased, they were still hunted.
  • 1970: The Indian government banned hunting tigers in the region.
  • 1982: The year saw a rise in the number of tigers in the region, causing the authorities to expand the park by adding 343 square kilometres to the existing land.
  • 1993: As Project Tiger saw success, its influence reached Bandhavgarh. The government then officially proclaimed it as a tiger reserve. At the same time, the reserve was expanded, by adding 437 square kilometres of buffer area and 694 square kilometres of the core area.
  • 2001: The Bandhavgarh National Park had 22 royal Bengal tigers, all concentrated in the tourist zone of 105 square kilometres, which made spotting them easy.
  • 2019: Thanks to the continuing conservation efforts of Project Tiger, Bandhavgarh now has around 60 royal Bengal tigers, and their population has shown an upward trend.

Wildlife in Bandhavgarh National Park

Bandhavgarh National Park undertook a Gaur Reintroduction Project in 2012, which has been marginally successful. Apart from its flourishing royal Bengal tigers population, the park is home to several other mammals such as the Indian leopard, caracal, Indian wolf and striped hyena.

Bandhavgarh is also home to several deer species such as chital, barking deer, and sambar. Other common wildlife species in the park are chinkara, chausinga, common langur, nilgai, sloth bear, and wild boar. The park hosts more than 300 bird species including wetland birds such as the painted sandgrouse, white-breasted waterhen, sarus crane, Asian openbill, black-headed ibis, and pheasant-tailed jacana.

Bandhavgarh National Park Premier Attractions

Bandhavgarh National Park has several attractions that are either located within the park or only a few hours drive away from it. While there are many you can choose to visit, here are the three most significant attractions:

  • Bandhavgarh Fort: Located atop Bandhavgarh hills, in the heart of the Bandhavgarh National Park, the fort has numerous attractions. Some of it is the caves at the base of the fort, monolithic statues of Lord Vishnu, and the water tanks carved out of volcanic tanks. Apart from its historical monuments, visitors can also see wildlife such as deer and tigers near the fort.
  • Baghel Museum: Located just a 100-meter distance away from the park, the Baghel Museum displays the personal belongings of Maharajas of Rewa along with their hunting and military equipment. In a sad tale, it also showcases the stuffed body of the first white tiger that was spotted by the then Maharaja of Rewa.
  • Mahamand Pond: Located in the park, near the Bandhavgarh Fort, the Mahaman Pond is surrounded by bamboo clumps. Its waters attract Bandhavgarh’s thirsty wildlife, making it an ideal place for wildlife viewing.

Other popular attractions include Rajbahera, the Shesh Shaya, Three Cave Point, Bari Gufa (“The Giant Cave”), Cheshpur waterfall, Climber’s Point and Kethika (Pendanus Point).

When to visit Bandhavgarh National Park

Bandhavgarh remains closed for the duration of the monsoon season which lasts from July to October. Except for the monsoon, visitors can plan a trip anytime in the year. November to February is ideal for birdwatchers. During this time, the park is filled with both the resident as well as migratory species. The temperatures might drop a little during these months, but they don’t hinder any activities.

The best time to see tigers in Bandhavgarh is during the hot summer months of April to May. Around this time, the wildlife gathers around the park’s remaining waterholes, making it easier to spot them.

You are the first to review

You May Also Be Interested In...

Gir National Park

Gir National Park

0 reviews

Gir National Park, also popularly known as Sasan Gir, is not only a national park but also a forest and wildlife sanctuary located in Gujarat. Gir National Park is one of two places in the world outside...

Kanha Tiger Reserve

Kanha Tiger Reserve

0 reviews

Located in Madhya Pradesh, a state that accounts for most of India's royal Bengal tiger population, the Kanha Tiger Reserve was one of the first few Project Tiger reserves to be established. Also known...

Ranthambore National Park

Ranthambore National Park

0 reviews

Ranthambore National Park, located in Rajasthan, is an iconic tiger safari destination in India. Since its establishment in 1955, the park has acted as a sanctuary for the forests and the wildlife contained...

Jim Corbett National Park

Jim Corbett National Park

0 reviews

Jim Corbett National Park, -Asia’s first national park, was initially called Hailey National Park after Lord Malcolm Hailey, the then Governor of the United Province. Since then, it has been renamed...

or sign in with
Global travel still has some restrictions but you can get inspiration for a future safari with SafariDeal. All enquiries are free - Safari & Tours. For current information about coronavirus (COVID-19), visit WHO, CDCP or a local health authority.